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Time to get politically proactive

Kerri Nuku, Kaiwhakahaere
NZNO Tōpūtanga Tapuhi Kaitiaki o Aotearoa

Nurses have long been marginalised in the politics of health and unfortunately, NZNO hasn’t been a strong enough advocate to challenge that. For years the organisation has made compromises and concessions because it didn’t have the political will or the belief in our collective strength to challenge power.

But we need to get past the idea that we’re non-partisan. Our work is political, our lives are political, and the powerful will exploit our apathy to their advantage. As health workers we’re advocates for our patients and as a union and professional organisation, we advocate for a better health system. To do that we must engage in politics. And by that I don’t mean endorsing a political party. I mean building and pushing our own vision of health and holding all decision-makers to account to get there.      

After all, unions have always fought on broader political causes because workers’ lives don’t just begin and end when they clock in. Unions have been part of the fight for Indigenous liberation, women’s rights, racial justice, climate justice and the peace movement across the world. As the union saying goes, “an injury to one is an injury to all.” We are part of a long history of collective struggle for all people.

I also want to point out that it’s not only our unionist roots that demand political courage, but our professional responsibilities too. When standards of practice are watered down or public health measures are eased against our better judgement, those are the result of political decisions that we must challenge. 

So now, with the general election on the horizon, we start seeing National and the Act Party rolling out racist rhetoric, including calls to extinguish the Māori Health Authority. They’re also advocating the same economic policies that gutted our health system. At the same time Labour will continue to make promises they won’t deliver on. We need to watch all this and be ready to push back on it.  

From this point on, NZNO must change the way it operates if we want to go from conservative to progressive, from reactionary to proactive. If we want what’s best for ourselves and our communities, we need to go hard and front foot on political issues.

We must start to empower people to do their own thinking and not be afraid to front divisive issues on race, gender, sexuality, class, and power. We can’t sit and wait for change to happen for us. We’ve got to be courageous and realise we have the power to make change. Not only do we have the power, we have the right and the responsibility to stand up, be heard and fight for a better future.


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Fighting the good fight – are we there yet?

Leadership blog, by Anne Daniels

Kerri Nuku ended her recent Leadership blog on pay equity with an important whakataukī, Ki te kotahi te kākaho ka whati, ki te kāpuia, e kore e whati – When we stand alone we are vulnerable, but together we are unbreakable.

We have some loud voices standing strong, but only from some of the many members we have. We need to all raise our voice because this fight isn’t just for DHB Nurses, or even all nurses. This fight is for all women everywhere in New Zealand and throughout the world. History tells us why.

The fight for fair pay for women started in the 1890’s for New Zealand women principally by the newly formed National Council of Women. In 1957 the Council for Equal Pay and Opportunities (CEPOP) was formed by a coalition of women and men’s organisations and unions and later in 1986, the Coalition for Equal Value, Equal Pay (CEVEP) was set up by women’s groups and unions with the Nurses Association prominent among them. After decades of organising, the Labour Government introduced the Employment Equity Act in 1990 to “redress past and present discrimination experienced by women in the labour market.” But this historic legislation was quickly repealed by the new National Government the same year.

This is the political context when, as a young nurse dissatisfied with pay and conditions, I became one of the few NZNO delegates in 1990. Since then, I’ve been in many campaigns for the same thing, fair pay and conditions. Each time we’ve failed because we were too trusting. In 2010, we received a small pay jump but within a few years the buying power of this rise had fallen away. Successive governments continue to fail women, reflecting the ingrained patriarchal attitudes of both men and women in power.

And here we are one hundred and twenty-two years later still fighting for justice. Ironically, our current Labour Health Minister has a union background and our female Prime Minister stands on the shoulders of women who fought for equality. We expect them to stand with us, not against us to right the wrong of the perpetual injustice of women being underpaid, while also enduring substantially poorer work conditions than men receive.

We can’t wait for others to do right for women. We must take our fight to the streets and join with all women, everywhere in New Zealand, as our fight is their fight. We put this government and any successive government on notice. We will fight without ceasing until we win, as together, we are unbreakable.

References:

Equal pay in New Zealand from 1988 to present (cevep.org.nz)


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Kotahitanga and the opportunities presented by Pay Equity

Kerri Nuku, Kaiwhakahaere
New Zealand Nurses Organisation, Tōpūtanga Tapuhi Kaitiaki o Aotearoa (NZNO)

This is a truly significant time. Despite the difficulties we’re currently facing, the rates offered to DHB nursing staff under the recent proposed Nursing Pay Equity settlement should be something to celebrate because it’s a formal recognition that we have been undervalued. Of course, it doesn’t come close to really addressing the power imbalance we face in a sexist society, but material compensation would be better than just words.

It’s taken an incredibly long time even to get to this point, and I think we owe it to ourselves and each other to be staunch and see this process through. It’s crucial for us to challenge with curiosity and hold fast to what we know our value to be. We can’t settle for anything that will undermine the future of nursing.

The fact that members are not satisfied with what’s been put in front of them is a positive thing because it has opened a conversation and presented us with possibilities. We’ve come across an obstacle, and now we’re given an opportunity to reflect, regather and renew our direction.

For me, the critical part of this, and the opportunity that we’re now afforded, is to put a line in the sand and say that all workers across all sectors need to be recognised. What we do today is important for our colleagues across the sectors.

We can truly enact kotahitanga and solidarity. We can be forward thinking, and above all, we can embrace a broader sense of justice than what the Government and employers want us to have. They want us to fight amongst each other for funding, to think it’s either DHB or Māori providers or Aged Caregivers. They also benefit if we think that Te Tiriti and equity are at odds with union principles. That kind of thinking creates division. It’s not the kind of thinking that wins the fight for justice.

We can and must fight for all, and in doing so we have to acknowledge that non-DHB campaigns haven’t had the same support at NZNO.

Just as nurses are trained to triage patients based on their acuity, everybody should get the care they need and deserve. Why shouldn’t we apply the same to our own organisation? Why can’t we also focus our resources on those who most deeply experience inequity?

Again, we don’t have to choose between, but our NZNO’s relative silence for those outside DHBs has to be addressed and together with the strength of 55,000 we can expand Pay Equity to all sectors. 

Ki te kotahi te kākaho ka whati, ki te kāpuia, e kore e whati – When we stand alone we are vulnerable, but together we are unbreakable.


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Nursing shortages – beyond crisis. Is there an upside?

Anne Daniels, President
New Zealand Nurses Organisation, Tōpūtanga Tapuhi Kaitiaki o Aotearoa (NZNO)

NZNO Kaiwhakahaere Kerri Nuku and I have repeatedly stated that DHBs and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand are beyond crisis when it comes to having enough appropriately trained and experienced nurses to do the job well. A crisis can be defined as a “time of intense difficulty or danger”. It’s also when important decisions must be made, and we are at that time.

Why (do we have to make a decision)?

Older nurses are retiring in droves; others are changing careers; too few are entering nursing study; and internationally qualified nurses (IQNs) are facing immigration barriers. This all makes the work pile higher on those left in the profession.

Nurses are working overtime and are repeatedly asked to give up valuable days off. As research affirms, exhausted nurses make mistakes and patients suffer as a result. So, despite this pressure, we’re hearing more and more that nurses are starting to say no. They’re saying, “I don’t know how much more we I can take. If things keep going the way they are, we’re going to lose patients and, as a nurse, that’s just too much to bear.”

National and international research shows nurses are feeling increasingly embattled. It’s not just the workloads or pay; it’s facing the “challenge of knowing what care patients need but being unable to provide it due to constraints beyond the nurses control.”[1]

On top of this are inequities across the health sector experienced by Māori and others in Aotearoa New Zealand. Nurses are leaving or reducing their hours of work, not responding to texts asking them to work on their time off, and in some countries, despite covid, they are striking.

What (are we going to decide) and when?

Our calls for action have been ignored for decades and we can’t wait for Government or employers any longer. Even though it will take years to overcome the complex issues we face, we must start now. It will take collaboration from the community, academia, all levels of health care and Government to work in real partnership with NZNO (as the largest representative of health workers) to develop creative solutions.

NZNO’s leadership and Board of Directors are working on an overarching campaign to ensure all nurses everywhere, work together to win the political and resourcing commitments needed to address the nursing shortage crisis permanently.

Last word…

There is an upside. We always need to know what we’re trying to achieve when we decide to stand up and fight the good fight. Power is generated from the bottom up. At 55,000 strong, we have the power in our hands to shape the future of nursing. We are all in this together and we will win.


[1]     Dean, W., Talbot, S., & Dean, A. (2019). Reframing clinician distress: Moral injury not burnout. Federal Practitioner, 36(9): 400–402. Reframing Clinician Distress: Moral Injury Not Burnout – PMC (nih.gov)


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Why does NZNO have a President and Kaiwhakahaere as co-leaders?

NZNO Kaiwhakahaere Kerri Nuku (left) and President Heather Symes

By NZNO President Heather Symes

NZNO has both a President and a Kaiwhakahaere as governance co-leaders. Among other things we chair the Board, and act as its public face and spokespersons when required. As Board members we have oversight of the organisation and its member groups, but we do not involve ourselves in the day-to-day running of the organisation (e.g. advocacy, the MECAs, Pay Equity etc). This work is done by staff and is managed by the Chief Executive.

So why are both a President and Kaiwhakahaere necessary?

Essentially we have these two offices working co-operatively as part of NZNO’s commitment to becoming a bi-cultural organisation and to working under te Tiriti o Waitangi.

It is important we acknowledge and work within te Tiriti so we can address appropriate cultural lenses to our organisation and its activities.  As a nation we cannot expect to move forward in unison unless each te Tiriti partner is aware of and respects the other’s worldview and approaches. We try to operate under te Tiriti in the same way as an organisation.

The Kaiwhakahaere is also the leader of Te Rūnanga (the Māori arm of the organisation) and supports Māori members by representing Te Rūnanga’s views to the Board. The Kaiwhakahaere also advises the organisation on what is culturally appropriate from an indigenous perspective.

The NZNO President has to this point never been indigenous, and brings a different (usually more western) cultural worldview. This means that together we have a rich tapestry and wealth of knowledge. But we are both equally accountable to members and work together to ensure plans going forward are good for members and therefore good for all in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Both positions are democratically elected, but there is a difference in how this is done for each. The President is elected by all paying members and can serve a maximum of two three-year terms. The Kaiwhakahaere is elected by Te Rūnanga at Hui ā tau every three years, but may serve more than two consecutive terms.

This is part and parcel of the bi-cultural approach we work towards under te Tiriti and an acknowledgement that different cultures may approach things like leadership differently.

It is entirely appropriate that the Kaiwhakahaere is elected only by Māori members but it is also important to note that his or her power is not unlimited. The Kaiwhakahaere’s performance is examined at each Hui ā Tau and they must be endorsed on a yearly basis to remain in the position. The President faces no such requirement. 

I hope that makes the co-leadership roles of the Kaiwhakahaere and President a little clearer.


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Year of the Nurse and the Midwife – Reflecting back as we move forward

by NZNO Kaiwhakahaere Kerri Nuku and President Grant Brookes

The World Health Organization has designated 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife. NZNO will be joining in to celebrate the contributions nurses and midwives make and to envision the even greater contributions we can make in the future.

As we reflect on the mahi of nurses and midwives, we take inspiration from the whakataukī: “Titiro whakamuri kōkiri whakamua – Look back and reflect so you can move forward.” In so doing we honour our ancestors and learn from past mistakes.

2020 also marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale. Florence is a hugely important figure in the development of our profession, but she left behind a mixed legacy.

Nurses, midwives and tohunga have been serving their communities and practising healing in Aotearoa for centuries; from long before when Florence was advising Colonial authorities in Aotearoa New Zealand about how to prevent the “inherent diseases” of the “savages” from leading to their extinction, as they were brought out of “barbarism” through “the inestimable blessings of Christian civilisation”.

In fact much of our nursing history has been marred by these sorts of conservative and racist views, some of which persist today.

Returning to the whakataukī with which we opened, here are just some of the notable figures and events in our history we can look back on:

  • In 1901, thanks to the pioneering efforts of Grace Neill, Aotearoa New Zealand became the first country in the world to pass legislation recognising the qualifications and status of registered nurses. Recognition of registered midwives came three years later.
  • In 1902 Ellen Dougherty of Palmerston North became the world’s first registered nurse.
  • Akenehi Hei became the first Māori nurse and midwife to register under her own [Māori] name six years later in 1908. However, Māori trained nurses were providing care even before official registration began, following in the footsteps of Mereana Tangata (Mary Ann Leonard) who qualified in 1896.
  • Founded in 1908, Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand is one of the world’s longest running nursing publications. Last year, Kai Tiaki became one of just 20 publications so far inducted into the Nursing Journal Hall of Fame at a ceremony in Reno, USA.
  • Turning 111 years old this year, the New Zealand Nurses Organisation Tōpūtanga Tapuhi Kaitiaki o Aotearoa is proud to be one of the world’s first professional nursing associations.

Our indigenous and home-grown nurses and midwives have made an immeasurable contribution throughout the 20th and 21st centuries towards raising the health of all peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. They’re now being joined by our internationally qualified nurses, too.

However, our health system today is under strain. Distressing health inequities persist and nurse and midwife shortages are predicted to grow. Historically our work has been undervalued because we are a female dominated profession. Thankfully an end is finally in sight, with the first Pay Equity settlements due this year. Entrenched pay disparities for those in Māori-led health care providers could also be closed at last, thanks to years of campaigning and a landmark claim lodged with the Waitangi Tribunal by Te Rūnanga o Aotearoa NZNO.

Nurses and midwives need to be properly deployed, valued and included in policy and decision-making. By the end of 2020, we hope to achieve greater investment in improving education, professional development, standards, regulation and employment conditions for nurses and midwives. Our goal is greater influence for nurses and midwives on health policy, more nurses and midwives in leadership positions, and more opportunities for development at all levels.

The needs of the 21st century also require innovative services that make better use of new technology. We need more community and marae-based services that are holistic and people-centred, as well as an increased focus on prevention and on undoing the harm caused by colonisation. These are all areas where we can play a leading role.

Finally, it is our hope that by the end of 2020, NZNO’s Strategy for Nursing 2018-2023 will be accepted across the health sector. This would signal a stronger commitment to a safer and more equitable future for all nurses and midwives in Aotearoa New Zealand.

“Me haere tahi tātou mō te hauora me te oranga o ngā iwi katoa o Aotearoa”, “Let us journey together for the health and wellbeing of the people of Aotearoa” (Rev Leo Te Kira 15 December 2005).


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NZNO Chief Executive Memo Musa: AGM Speech 2019

17 September 2019

Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou katoa.
It is my pleasure to welcome you all here to NZNO’s 26th AGM and to the Conference tomorrow.

I would like to acknowledge the outgoing Board, the incoming Board, Te Poari and the Membership Committee. I would like to thank our exhibitors and sponsors for both the AGM today and Conference tomorrow, and especially our sponsors Summerset and Pharmac.

The theme of tomorrow’s Conference is “Leaving No One Behind – Health For All” and I want to talk about the past financial year in light of that theme which captures the very reason we exist as an organisation.

We are here to support nurses, midwives, student nurses and health care workers as they work daily to ensure “no one is left behind”.

Nurses are there for us from the day we are born to the day we die, and on many occasions in between. They provide expert but compassionate care, often under trying circumstances. They are trained, knowledgeable and skilled, and they positively affect the health and wellbeing of us all.

The theme of our AGM and Conference is an appropriate one as it relates to the first pillar of our Strategic Plan which is improved health outcomes.  We want a sustainable, strong and skilled nursing workforce (the second and third pillars) so all people living in New Zealand can be healthier, and no one is left behind.

On top of what we achieve for members by supporting them in their nursing professional practice and negotiating collective agreements, there is the collaboration we engage in with the Ministry of Health, employers and other partners to improve working conditions and achieve pay equity.

As well as the industrial and professional support we give members daily, there is the research and advocacy work we do to improve policy around nursing both here and internationally in collaboration with other organisations.

A lot of what we do is highlighted in the Annual Report for the year 2018/19 and in my CE report within it. In what has been a challenging year, it is timely to focus on the positive. Alongside our members, we are doing many good things for the health and wellbeing of New Zealanders so no one is left behind.

I would be remiss not to mention our membership growth and finances. At the end of March this year our membership numbers reached 52,093 – an increase of 2.7 percent from the previous year; and we are currently at 51,339 members.

We ended the year with a net financial surplus of $153,288.  The gains from the investment portfolio increased that to $996,164.

I would like to conclude by reminding us, as I have done before, that united we stand, divided we fall. We are one profession with many roles and voices, we are a collective and together we can continue to have a massive influence. Together we make an effective team.

I would like to place on record my sincere appreciation the work our staff have done on your behalf.  I also thank you as delegates for the many volunteer hours you have put into NZNO’s work.

No reira, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou katoa.

Memo Musa, NZNO Chief Executive


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A nursing renaissance – NZNO’s input into the Health and Disability System Review

Memo Musa, Chief Executive, NZNO

As many will know, the Government announced a review of the New Zealand Health and Disability System in September 2018. The purpose of the review was to identify opportunities to improve the performance, structure, and sustainability of our current Health and Disability System. Its goals are achieving equity of outcomes, and contributing to wellness for all – particularly Māori and Pasifika.

The first interim report by the Expert Review Panel (led by Heather Simpson, a special advisor in the Prime Minister’s Office) was released in early September 2019. In response NZNO met with Heather Simpson, Sarah Prentice and Margaret Southwick (a Panel member) in early October 2019 to present our work and suggestions around the report’s three key themes of Leadership, System Complexity and Equity. The presentation was prepared by Eldred Gilbert (Visibility of Nursing Project Lead), Hilary Graham-Smith (Associate Professional Services Manager) and myself, with input from Kaiwhakahaere Kerri Nuku and President Grant Brookes. The presentation was led by Hilary.

We agreed that the current Health and Disability System is not serving people living in Aotearoa New Zealand well. We discussed the utility of nursing as key to making a difference to the issues of equity and access for under-served individuals, families and communities. After all, nurses are well-versed and experienced in population health. They understand: wellness, health promotion and illness prevention; their framework for care is holistic; and they are experts in system and boundary navigation. Nurses also have a common agenda – to work in partnership in an integrated system that best serves the needs of people.

Unfortunately, the current system makes it impossible for nursing leadership to be freed up and maximised in policy and services design/delivery at a Tier 1/Primary Care level. Funding, contractual and employment arrangements constrict the way nurses practise, and impede them from working in the way they could to reduce system complexity.

It is important the Panel considers establishing a ‘peak body’ of nurses to help in co-design processes for nursing that allow for integration of services, and to develop a model of care whereby nurses can fully contribute to the health and social care needs of the population by utilising all of their skills – and this is what we have recommended. With abundant knowledge, skill and adaptability, nurses have the opportunity to offer alternative and innovative approaches to delivering health services that can make the real difference required.

Such a nursing renaissance falls well within the scope of the NZNO Strategic Plan 2015-2020. The first pillar of our Strategic Plan is to improve health outcomes by promoting excellence in patient care. The third is having a strong workforce by strengthening nursing and workforce planning, sustainability and leadership.

There remains much work to do in further developing our thinking and we will keep you updated on progress. We are pleased that members of the Review Panel are listening and that the Panel has the skills and knowledge to appreciate our suggestions.

I would like finish by thanking Eldred Gilbert and Hilary Graham-Smith for their ongoing work on this project, and Kerri and Grant for their input and support.


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Nurses’ and teachers’ settlements: a brief comparison

1810-lesleyLesley Harry, DHB Industrial Adviser, NZNO

As this is being written, voting has just started for primary school teachers who are members of NZEI on their proposed settlement of June 2019. Inevitably, comparisons are being made by some between the outcomes achieved by teachers this year and by nurses last year with the NZNO-DHB MECA settlement.

This brief article will make some general comments on how the offers to teachers and to nurses compare and is not an in-depth analysis.

General comments

It is important to note that this comparison only applies to the proposed settlement for primary school teachers (NZEI). At the time of writing the Post Primary Teachers Association (PPTA) is yet to vote on the proposed settlement.

We do not find it helpful to take a “which profession deserves more” approach. Teaching and nursing are both professions that are: essential to the well-being of Aotearoa New Zealand, female-dominated and significantly undervalued historically.

Similar processes and results

The process and results for nurses and teachers have in fact been quite similar. In each case there was an extended bargaining process with multiple offers rejected until a significantly better employer offer resulted after strike action.

In each case a series of pay increases was won, an accord was achieved promising further changes to the resourcing of the profession, new steps were introduced and a pro rata lump sum payment was offered (nurses $2000; teachers $1500).

NZNO was very supportive of the teachers in their bargaining and industrial action. Our support, including turning up at their demonstrations, was well-received and appreciated.

Similar wages

The teachers’ proposed pay increases are comparable to the 2018 NZNO/DHB MECA pay rises. Direct comparisons between the professions can be quite difficult and need a lot of explanation or clarification but we can provide some basics.

With the teachers’ proposed settlement, Q3 teachers (teachers with a three-year degree) on $71,891 will move to $75,200 in 1 July 2019. Under the NZNO DHB MECA agreement the salary for registered nurses and midwives on step 6 will increase to a very similar $75,132 on 5 August 2019. The new Step 7 of $77,386 for registered nurses and midwives comes into effect on 4 May 2020.

Q3 Teachers at year 9 (nine years’ experience) will transition to $83,000 on 1 July 2020, but note that this is just before the DHB/NZNO MECA expiry and subsequent re-negotiation, which are likely to result in salary increases.

So it is not until 1 July 2020 that a Q3 teacher at the top of the scale will be paid more than a registered nurse. If we look at the lower end of the scale, the comparison is much better for nurses. For example, a new grad teacher starts on $48,401 (on 1 July 2019). An RN is on $52,460 as of 1 May 2019. A Q3 teacher with five years’ service will be on $62,000 (from 1 July 2019). An RN with five years’ service has been on $70,820 since 6 May 2019.

The length of the term is important to the comparison

It is important to note that the NZEI collective agreement (CA) expired in May 2018. The term of the new proposed CA is 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2022. However, the actual period from the expiry of the previous CA and expiry of the proposed CA is more than four years.

The average pay increases for teachers stated as overall being 18.5%  is comparable to the DHB/NZNO MECA increases of around 15% when the term and expiry of the teachers’ settlement is taken into account.

The NZNO/DHB MECA expires on 31 July 2020 – two years prior to the expiry of the teachers’ proposed CA. This means NZNO is well positioned to close or improve on any remaining gaps with teachers’ wages at the 2020 NZNO-DHB negotiations.

Let’s not forget pay equity

A significant difference between the settlements is pay equity, which was raised as a claim by NZNO as part of the MECA negotiations. The pay equity process is underway and making progress, with the agreed outcome recognised as effective from 31 December 2019.

We cannot yet say for sure what the results of this process will be, but it is likely to mean even further significant wage increases for nurses.


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Katrina Hopkinson: Pay Equity – Why should nurses have to struggle?

NZNO made an oral submission to the Education and Workforce Committee on 6 March 2019 on the Equal Pay Amendment Bill 2018. Katrina was part of our delegation. This is her speech.

Kia Ora Koutou,

My name is Katrina Hopkinson. I’m a registered nurse at the post anaesthetic care unit, commonly called ‘Recovery’, a critical care unit, in a tertiary level hospital here in the capital city.

I have 12 years nursing experience, a Bachelor of Nursing degree, a post graduate Diploma in Nursing and a post graduate Certificate in Occupational Health. I am an NZNO delegate and health and safety representative.

Nurses are highly qualified with advanced interpersonal, assessment and technical knowledge and skill. Our work carried great professional responsibility and personal risk. The risk of error has potentially serious adverse consequences for public safety. Our work is classed as highly stressful and at time repugnant.

Nursing is mentally, physically, emotionally and frequently ethically demanding. We are really good at it but we know we are being unfairly remunerated to reflect the true scope of practice, professional skill and responsibility demanded of us daily. To cite nursing as ‘woman’s work’ or ‘caring’ fails to recognise the true nature of nursing in 2019.

I am hoping the DHB MECA Pay Equity process is going to close the gender-based pay gap once and for all on 31 December 2019 because, currently, nurses struggle to participate fully in society. We do extra shifts to make ends meet, keeping us away from our family and friends. Our remuneration is clearly less than that of comparable occupations but we pay the same price for groceries, petrol, child care and interest rates. It is grossly unfair.

In our unit of 42 staff just a quarter own their own home. A third can afford dental check-ups and, in the event of a natural disaster, about a quarter could walk home from work. We can’t afford to live in the communities we work in, and the local bank has told us to leave the profession if we ever want to own a home in Wellington. The bank algorithms say we don’t earn enough. There is an incongruence between our financial and professional status.

No one ever thought they’d get rich nursing, but we thought we’d be able to secure warm dry housing and dental care. Nurses are voting with their feet, leaving for Australia where our skills are sought after. We can’t afford to keep losing experienced nurses with the looming workforce shortage. Pay Equity could make a real difference to retention.

I’m here today to stand up for all NZNO members, nurses across New Zealand and all the workers in female-dominated professions to tell you we demand equal pay for work of equal value now. Pay Equity is good for New Zealand families, communities and the economy.

See also: Nurses’ impassioned plea in favour of pay equity: ‘We can’t afford to live in the communities we work in’, Dominion Post, 6 March 2019 (includes video).